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Activity Title: Leveraging Vaccines to Reduce Antibiotics Use and Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance

Release Date: September 15, 2021

Estimated Time to Complete Activity: 70 minutes

Statement of Need:

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the biggest global health threats. Antibiotics are becoming increasingly ineffective as drug-resistance spreads leading to more difficult to treat infections. Fighting this threat is a public health priority that requires a collaborative global approach across sectors.


Controlling AMR demands improvements in infection prevention, antimicrobial stewardship, and antimicrobial discovery. A powerful measure to reduce the use of antimicrobials, and hence development of resistance, is to prevent the occurrence of infections. Vaccines can impact AMR in two ways. Vaccines can reduce or eliminate the risk of infection due to antibiotic-resistant strains, for example pneumococcal vaccine. Vaccines can also have a secondary effect on AMR by preventing antibiotic use by reducing the rates of viral febrile illness episodes and the likelihood of secondary bacterial infections following the prevented episode. Viral infections are a strong driver of use and misuse of antibiotics and vaccines are an impactful and effective public health measure for the prevention of many viral infections. Single or combination vaccines may ultimately result in synergistic effects on decreasing antimicrobial use and therefore resistance. In this way, vaccines targeting viral illnesses become a tool to reinforce policies of antibiotic stewardship.

WHO has developed a strategy to articulate the role of vaccines against AMR and an action framework that describes a vision for vaccines to contribute fully, sustainably and equitably to the prevention and control of antimicrobial resistance by preventing infections and reducing antimicrobial use. During this webinar, speakers will discuss how vaccines targeting viral illnesses contribute to the battle against AMR by preventing infections and by reducing antimicrobial use. 

Faculty:
Anthony Fiore
Associate Director for Policy and Liaison Activities
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Professor Paul Anantharajah Tambyah
Professor, Department of Medicine
Senior Consultant, Division of Infectious Disease, University Medicine Cluster, National University Hospital
Joint Appointment: Visiting Consultant, Singapore Armed Forces

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Contact Information

If you have questions about this CME activity, please contact The International Society for Infectious Diseases at  info@isid.org.

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Upon completion of this module, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), one of the biggest global health threats.
  • Explain why antibiotics are becoming increasingly ineffective as drug-resistance spreads leading to more difficult to treat infections. Discuss the importance of fighting this threat in a collaborative global approach across sectors.
  • Understand the importance of controlling AMR, and the steps needed to do it - including mproving infection prevention, antimicrobial stewardship, and antimicrobial discovery.
  • Discuss the impact of vaccines on AMR 
  • Discuss the WHO strategy as regards the role of vaccines against AMR and their action framework that describes a vision for vaccines to contribute fully, sustainably and equitably to the prevention and control of antimicrobial resistance by preventing infections and reducing antimicrobial use. 

The target audience for this module is physicians, nurses, public health officials, microbiologists, and other health professionals.

  • Klugman KP, Black S. Impact of existing vaccines in reducing antibiotic resistance: Primary and secondary effects. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Dec 18;115(51):12896-12901. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1721095115. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30559195/

Disclosure Policy

In accordance with the EACCME Standards for Commercial Support, the International Society for Infectious Diseases (ISID) requires that individuals in a position to control the content of an educational activity disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. ISID  resolves all conflicts of interest to ensure independence, objectivity, balance, and scientific rigor in all our educational programs. Furthermore, ISID seeks to verify that all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in a CME/CE activity conforms to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis. ISID is committed to providing learners with high-quality CME/CE activities that promote improvements in health care and not those of a commercial interest.

Activity Staff Disclosures:

The planners, reviewers, editors, staff, or other members at the International Society for Infectious Diseases who control content have no relevant financial relationships to disclose. 

ISID Knowledge Exchange and E-Learning Platform Organizing Committee members are listed here along with Committee members’ disclosure forms. 

Faculty Disclosures:

Antony Fiore has no potential conflict of interest to report

Professor Paul Anantharajah Tambyah
Affiliation/Financial Interest and Name of Commercial Company
Grants/Research Support: Roche, Arcturus, Johnson and Johnson
Honoraria or Consultation Fees: Takeda and Roche

Moderator Disclosures:

Marc Mendelson has no actual or potential conflict of interest in relation to this program/presentation
Afreenish Amir 
has no actual or potential conflict of interest in relation to this program/presentation

Disclosure of Unlabeled Use

The International Society for Infectious Diseases  requires CME faculty (speakers) to disclose when products or procedures being discussed are off label, unlabeled, experimental, and/or investigational, and any limitations on the information that is presented, such as data that are preliminary, or that represent ongoing research, interim analyses, and/or unsupported opinion. Faculty in this activity may discuss information about pharmaceutical agents that is outside of US Food and Drug Administration approved labeling. This information is intended solely for continuing medical education and is not intended to promote off-label use of these medications. ISID does not recommend the use of any agent outside of the labeled indications. If you have questions, contact the Medical Affairs Department of the manufacturer for the most recent prescribing information.

Disclaimer

The International Society for Infectious Diseases presents this information for educational purposes only. The content is provided solely by faculty who have been selected because of recognized expertise in their field. Participants have the professional responsibility to ensure that products are prescribed and used appropriately on the basis of their own clinical judgment and accepted standards of care. The International Society for Infectious Diseases, and the former commercial supporter assume no liability for the information herein.

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Privacy Policy

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Leveraging Vaccines to Reduce Antibiotics Use and Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance

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