Emerging Infectious Diseases Preparedness – Looking Through the One Health Lens
IKEEP. & Peter Daszak G. 11/18/20; 312746
George Gao, Kanta Kumari Rigaud & Peter Daszak
George Gao, Kanta Kumari Rigaud & Peter Daszak
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Information:
OPEN-ACCESS Live Session
Nov. 18th, 2020 12PM GMT
(New York: 8 AM, Brussels: 2 PM)

Featuring:
Dr. Peter Daszak, President, EcoHealth Alliance
"Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases"

Prof. George Gao, Director-General, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
"One Health and Pandemic Preparedness in China and Beyond"

Dr. Kanta Kumari Rigaud, Lead Enviromental Specialist & Regional Climate Change Coordinayor - Africa Region, World Bank
"Climate Change, Migration, and Infectious Diseases" 



 
Title: Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases
 
Authors:
Peter Daszak, EcoHealth Alliance, New York, USA
 
Abstract:
Most high-impact emerging diseases are caused by zoonotic viruses. They emerge through a complex interaction of socio-economic and environmental drivers acting on contact networks among wildlife, livestock and people. Over the past 20 years EcoHealth Alliance has conducted field studies and ecological analyses to trace back the origins of specific diseases, estimate viral diversity in wildlife reservoirs, and identify the geographical regions and global changes most likely to produce pandemics. Using examples from Nipah virus, SARS coronavirus and others, I will show how understanding emerging disease ecology can provide answers to critical questions for emerging viruses, including:
  1. Where will the next emerging virus originate?
  2. What are the key causes of disease emergence?
  3. Which reservoir species will the next EID likely emerge from?
  4. How many unknown viruses do these species harbor, and how many can infect us?
  5. Can we predict and prevent emergence, and how much will it cost?
Reducing the risk of new emerging diseases is a key scientific challenge that will require global cooperation because novel viruses mainly originate in tropical regions, but have the highest economic impact on richer, rapidly developing countries in the North. Despite the exponential increase in EID threats, our work shows that cooperative strategies to combat these threats will provide significant return-on-investment as well as public health benefits.


Climate Change, Migration, and Infectious Diseases
Kanta Kumari Rigaud Ph.D.
Lead Environment Specialist, Africa Region, World Bank Group

 
Climate change is emerging as a potent driver of migration. Climate migrants will move from
less viable areas with lower water availability and crop productivity and from areas affected
by rising sea level and storm surges. The poorest and most climate-vulnerable areas will
be hardest hit. These trends, alongside the emergence of “hotspots” of climate in- and climate out-migration, will have major implications for climate-sensitive sectors and for the adequacy of urban infrastructure and social support systems, including health systems. Climate change affects the health and safety of persons directly through factors such as heat stress, water-borne diseases, malnutrition and stunting.  At the same time, climate change is also altering the spread of vector borne diseases such as the Zika virus, dengue fever, malaria, and Lyme disease by altering the conditions under which the disease vectors  develop and the pathogens they carry. Mobility of people can amplify the spread and patterns of these infectious diseases. There is a need for urgent and concrete climate and development focused action.  A focus on the human face of climate change must be at the heart of these actions with a conviction to strive for healthy, safe, and secure communities.
 
Title: Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases
 
Authors:
Peter Daszak, EcoHealth Alliance, New York, USA
 
Abstract:
Most high-impact emerging diseases are caused by zoonotic viruses. They emerge through a complex interaction of socio-economic and environmental drivers acting on contact networks among wildlife, livestock and people. Over the past 20 years EcoHealth Alliance has conducted field studies and ecological analyses to trace back the origins of specific diseases, estimate viral diversity in wildlife reservoirs, and identify the geographical regions and global changes most likely to produce pandemics. Using examples from Nipah virus, SARS coronavirus and others, I will show how understanding emerging disease ecology can provide answers to critical questions for emerging viruses, including:
  1. Where will the next emerging virus originate?
  2. What are the key causes of disease emergence?
  3. Which reservoir species will the next EID likely emerge from?
  4. How many unknown viruses do these species harbor, and how many can infect us?
  5. Can we predict and prevent emergence, and how much will it cost?
Reducing the risk of new emerging diseases is a key scientific challenge that will require global cooperation because novel viruses mainly originate in tropical regions, but have the highest economic impact on richer, rapidly developing countries in the North. Despite the exponential increase in EID threats, our work shows that cooperative strategies to combat these threats will provide significant return-on-investment as well as public health benefits.


Climate Change, Migration, and Infectious Diseases
Kanta Kumari Rigaud Ph.D.
Lead Environment Specialist, Africa Region, World Bank Group

 
Climate change is emerging as a potent driver of migration. Climate migrants will move from
less viable areas with lower water availability and crop productivity and from areas affected
by rising sea level and storm surges. The poorest and most climate-vulnerable areas will
be hardest hit. These trends, alongside the emergence of “hotspots” of climate in- and climate out-migration, will have major implications for climate-sensitive sectors and for the adequacy of urban infrastructure and social support systems, including health systems. Climate change affects the health and safety of persons directly through factors such as heat stress, water-borne diseases, malnutrition and stunting.  At the same time, climate change is also altering the spread of vector borne diseases such as the Zika virus, dengue fever, malaria, and Lyme disease by altering the conditions under which the disease vectors  develop and the pathogens they carry. Mobility of people can amplify the spread and patterns of these infectious diseases. There is a need for urgent and concrete climate and development focused action.  A focus on the human face of climate change must be at the heart of these actions with a conviction to strive for healthy, safe, and secure communities.
 

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