ISID WEBINAR SERIES: The Impact of COVID-19 on Global Infectious Diseases
IKEEP. Prof. François Venter & Prof. Lulu Bravo . 10/07/20; 311135
  Prof. François Venter &
Prof. Lulu Bravo
Prof. François Venter & Prof. Lulu Bravo
Biography
Abstract
Information:
OPEN-ACCESS Live Session
Oct. 7th, 2020 1PM GMT
(New York: 9 AM, Brussels: 3 PM)

Moderators:
Prof. Alison Holmes (United Kingdom)
Prof. Paul Tambyah (Singapore)
Dr. Afreenish Amir (Pakistan)
 
Speakers:
Prof. François Venter (South Africa) Balancing COVID-19 responses against public health gains in HIV and TB
Prof. Lulu Bravo (The Philippines) Decline in childhood immunization services globally

COVID-19 may have complex short- and long-term effects on global infectious disease priorities. With the world’s attention and resources focused towards COVID-19 prevention and response efforts, we are at risk of major infectious diseases making a comeback. As observed during previous crises, the indirect morbidity and mortality effects of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may be as important as the direct effects of the pandemic itself. There are widespread disruptions to HIV, TB and malaria service delivery programs globally with shortages in medical supplies, treatments and diagnostics. Existing programs have been hit by lockdowns, changing funding priorities and re-allocation of staff and resources. It is estimated that the disruption of routine childhood immunization services across the globe puts at least 80 million children under one at risk of vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, polio, yellow fever, typhoid, cholera and tetanus. On the other hand, emphasis on infection prevention measures such as hand hygiene and social distancing could reduce the occurrence of community and healthcare associated infectious diseases, providing an opportunity to harness improved practices, behavior changes and attitude modifications relevant to the management of many infections. The full impact of COVID-19 on respiratory diseases and the influenza season remains unknown. Disruptions in disease surveillance and reporting further add to the complexity of understanding the true impact of COVID-19 on communicable diseases. 

Learning Objectives:
During this webinar, global infectious diseases experts will discuss the wider impact of COVID-19 on global infectious disease priorities and how to urgently tackle the COVID-19 pandemic while simultaneously dealing with those existing priorities. There is an urgent need to gather knowledge and evidence to rapidly shape and inform coordinated strategies at the individual, health-care and policy levels to reduce the potential longer-term impact.

Biographies of Moderators:
Alison Holmes (United Kingdom)
ISID President

Alison has a longstanding clinical and research career in global infectious diseases, with particular interests in antibiotic use, antimicrobial resistance (AMR), epidemiology and public health within healthcare and has served on the Executive Committee of the ISID, chairing the Education and the Publications Committee and introducing the Emerging Leaders initiative. She is a Professor of Infectious Diseases at Imperial College, a Fellow of the UK’s Academy of Medical Sciences and a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Senior Investigator.

She leads a large multidisciplinary research group and network, with strong international collaborations. She is Director of the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections (HCAI) and AMR and the Centre of Antimicrobial Optimisation at Imperial College. In the National Health Service, she is an Associate Medical Director leading a multi-professional service and a senior ID consultant. In addition to her work in infectious diseases, she has served as medical advisor to VSO, UK and has been involved in refugee health, and in health and human rights. She served as an expert member of the Governmental Advisory Committee on AMR and HCAI for nine years and she now chairs the Technical Advisory Group for the Fleming Fund. She sits on a variety of WHO expert groups and committees and sits on or chairs numerous national and international scientific advisory boards, funding panels and editorial boards.

Alison spent much of her life overseas. She attended Cambridge University as an undergraduate and then went to St George’s Medical school London. She worked in communicable diseases and tropical medicine in Oxford, gained her DTM&H from London, and was awarded an ID fellowship to spend at Boston University, where her research was conducted in the Maxwell Finland Laboratories and where she gained an MPH in International Health from Harvard School of Public Health.

Prof. Paul Tambyah (Singapore)

Paul Anantharajah Tambyah is currently Professor of Medicine at the National University of Singapore and Senior Consultant Infectious Diseases Physician at the National University Hospital. He is also Research Director in the Division of Infectious Diseases of the National University Health System. After graduating from the National University of Singapore, he did his postgraduate training at the University of Wisconsin under Dr. Dennis Maki and since returning to Singapore in 1999 he has held a number of academic, professional and advisory appointments including Assistant Dean of the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine. He is immediate past president of the Society of Infectious Diseases (Singapore) and Secretary-General of the Asia Pacific Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection.

Dr. Afreenish Amir (Pakistan)

Dr Afreenish Amir, a medical microbiologist with over eleven years of experience in clinical microbiology and infectious diseases; currently working as Laboratory Coordinator in CDC Global Health Security Agenda project at National Institute of Health, Islamabad, Pakistan. She is working on implementation of National Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance, GLASS, AMR Surveillance and Advocacy in Pakistan. Her contributions include development of Pakistan AMR Surveillance Plan, establishment of AMR data portal for data submission to NIH, M&E plan for Pakistan AMR Surveillance, WHONET training to sentinel sites, WHONET booklet development in Urdu, AMR dictionary, development of Provincial AMR action plans, GLASS data collection/quality audit/reports, AMR website launch, AMR eModule development for capacity building of sentinel sites. She is focal point for Environmental Surveillance for Cholera (BMGF funded project), Candida auris surveillance (GLASS fungi) and BMGF COVID-19 Grant for Pakistan. She is project manager for AMR ECHO in the Pakistan. She is Lead Auditor ISO 9001:2015 (CQI, IRCA UK, Hong Kong Veritas HKV). She is recently selected as Course Coordinator for MBA International Health Management (Swiss TPH).
She has submitted her thesis for PhD Microbiology (nanomedicine). She is a GIBACHT fellow and facilitator (Germany), Harvard Kennedy School and GCSP Geneva alumna (on Global Health Security), ISID Emerging leader in Infectious Diseases (USA), Regional Coordinator for NEXTGenGHSA (USA), Master trainer for Biosafety (PBSA), Infection prevention/control (NIH) and Consultant Clinical Microbiology for American Society of Microbiology.














 
Information:
OPEN-ACCESS Live Session
Oct. 7th, 2020 1PM GMT
(New York: 9 AM, Brussels: 3 PM)

Moderators:
Prof. Alison Holmes (United Kingdom)
Prof. Paul Tambyah (Singapore)
Dr. Afreenish Amir (Pakistan)
 
Speakers:
Prof. François Venter (South Africa) Balancing COVID-19 responses against public health gains in HIV and TB
Prof. Lulu Bravo (The Philippines) Decline in childhood immunization services globally

COVID-19 may have complex short- and long-term effects on global infectious disease priorities. With the world’s attention and resources focused towards COVID-19 prevention and response efforts, we are at risk of major infectious diseases making a comeback. As observed during previous crises, the indirect morbidity and mortality effects of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may be as important as the direct effects of the pandemic itself. There are widespread disruptions to HIV, TB and malaria service delivery programs globally with shortages in medical supplies, treatments and diagnostics. Existing programs have been hit by lockdowns, changing funding priorities and re-allocation of staff and resources. It is estimated that the disruption of routine childhood immunization services across the globe puts at least 80 million children under one at risk of vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, polio, yellow fever, typhoid, cholera and tetanus. On the other hand, emphasis on infection prevention measures such as hand hygiene and social distancing could reduce the occurrence of community and healthcare associated infectious diseases, providing an opportunity to harness improved practices, behavior changes and attitude modifications relevant to the management of many infections. The full impact of COVID-19 on respiratory diseases and the influenza season remains unknown. Disruptions in disease surveillance and reporting further add to the complexity of understanding the true impact of COVID-19 on communicable diseases. 

Learning Objectives:
During this webinar, global infectious diseases experts will discuss the wider impact of COVID-19 on global infectious disease priorities and how to urgently tackle the COVID-19 pandemic while simultaneously dealing with those existing priorities. There is an urgent need to gather knowledge and evidence to rapidly shape and inform coordinated strategies at the individual, health-care and policy levels to reduce the potential longer-term impact.

Biographies of Moderators:
Alison Holmes (United Kingdom)
ISID President

Alison has a longstanding clinical and research career in global infectious diseases, with particular interests in antibiotic use, antimicrobial resistance (AMR), epidemiology and public health within healthcare and has served on the Executive Committee of the ISID, chairing the Education and the Publications Committee and introducing the Emerging Leaders initiative. She is a Professor of Infectious Diseases at Imperial College, a Fellow of the UK’s Academy of Medical Sciences and a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Senior Investigator.

She leads a large multidisciplinary research group and network, with strong international collaborations. She is Director of the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections (HCAI) and AMR and the Centre of Antimicrobial Optimisation at Imperial College. In the National Health Service, she is an Associate Medical Director leading a multi-professional service and a senior ID consultant. In addition to her work in infectious diseases, she has served as medical advisor to VSO, UK and has been involved in refugee health, and in health and human rights. She served as an expert member of the Governmental Advisory Committee on AMR and HCAI for nine years and she now chairs the Technical Advisory Group for the Fleming Fund. She sits on a variety of WHO expert groups and committees and sits on or chairs numerous national and international scientific advisory boards, funding panels and editorial boards.

Alison spent much of her life overseas. She attended Cambridge University as an undergraduate and then went to St George’s Medical school London. She worked in communicable diseases and tropical medicine in Oxford, gained her DTM&H from London, and was awarded an ID fellowship to spend at Boston University, where her research was conducted in the Maxwell Finland Laboratories and where she gained an MPH in International Health from Harvard School of Public Health.

Prof. Paul Tambyah (Singapore)

Paul Anantharajah Tambyah is currently Professor of Medicine at the National University of Singapore and Senior Consultant Infectious Diseases Physician at the National University Hospital. He is also Research Director in the Division of Infectious Diseases of the National University Health System. After graduating from the National University of Singapore, he did his postgraduate training at the University of Wisconsin under Dr. Dennis Maki and since returning to Singapore in 1999 he has held a number of academic, professional and advisory appointments including Assistant Dean of the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine. He is immediate past president of the Society of Infectious Diseases (Singapore) and Secretary-General of the Asia Pacific Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection.

Dr. Afreenish Amir (Pakistan)

Dr Afreenish Amir, a medical microbiologist with over eleven years of experience in clinical microbiology and infectious diseases; currently working as Laboratory Coordinator in CDC Global Health Security Agenda project at National Institute of Health, Islamabad, Pakistan. She is working on implementation of National Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance, GLASS, AMR Surveillance and Advocacy in Pakistan. Her contributions include development of Pakistan AMR Surveillance Plan, establishment of AMR data portal for data submission to NIH, M&E plan for Pakistan AMR Surveillance, WHONET training to sentinel sites, WHONET booklet development in Urdu, AMR dictionary, development of Provincial AMR action plans, GLASS data collection/quality audit/reports, AMR website launch, AMR eModule development for capacity building of sentinel sites. She is focal point for Environmental Surveillance for Cholera (BMGF funded project), Candida auris surveillance (GLASS fungi) and BMGF COVID-19 Grant for Pakistan. She is project manager for AMR ECHO in the Pakistan. She is Lead Auditor ISO 9001:2015 (CQI, IRCA UK, Hong Kong Veritas HKV). She is recently selected as Course Coordinator for MBA International Health Management (Swiss TPH).
She has submitted her thesis for PhD Microbiology (nanomedicine). She is a GIBACHT fellow and facilitator (Germany), Harvard Kennedy School and GCSP Geneva alumna (on Global Health Security), ISID Emerging leader in Infectious Diseases (USA), Regional Coordinator for NEXTGenGHSA (USA), Master trainer for Biosafety (PBSA), Infection prevention/control (NIH) and Consultant Clinical Microbiology for American Society of Microbiology.














 

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